Designed in 1929 by Philip Trammell Shutze, the May Patterson Goodrum House was considered to be his favorite project, perhaps due to the fact he more than likely had free-reign over its design and decoration. Upon its completion in 1930, the design earned an honorable mention by the Architecture League of New York, a first for Shutze and a rare recognition by the League for southern architecture. If anything, the prize was an overdue accolade for a designer of national importance and for a city consciously striving to shed its undeserved provincial southern identity. It did serve as a milestone of remarkable achievement for the architect recognized as the creator of Atlanta’s finest built environment and lauded as America’s foremost classicist.

  • Undated letter from Allyn Cox to Phillip Trammell Shutze (23rd Sept. c. 1949-1950s) regarding the dining room murals at Goodrum House
    “ By the way, someone told me the other day that he always shows that room when he lectures on mural decoration as a perfect example of paintings that go with the architecture—we really seem to have struck something that time that has lasted all these years. ”
    Undated letter from Allyn Cox to Phillip Trammell Shutze (23rd Sept. c. 1949-1950s) regarding the dining room murals at Goodrum House
    Philip Trammell Shutze papers, MSS 498, James G. Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center

The May Patterson Goodrum House is currently owned by the Watson-Brown Foundation. The Watson-Brown Foundation, through creativity, diligence and financial support, labors to improve education in the American South by funding its schools and students, preserving its history, encouraging responsible scholarship, and promoting the memory and values of our spiritual founders.